Terminal Emulator code samples

Wait for text in the emulator screen

This example demonstrates how to use terminal emulator objects and their respective properties to wait for a text in the emulator screen.

it("Verify waitForText method",function(done) {
	// Following is the program flow:
	// 1. Need to have a Terminal Emulator configured.
	// 2. Identify a TeScreen test object based on some descriptive properties.
	// 3. Select text from the emulator screen that you want to wait for. Example "Program/procedure". OR
	//    The user can insert text into a field and verify with WaitForText method if the text was inserted.
	// 4. Define an Area() object where the text is located and select the timeout in milliseconds.
	// 5. Call method WaitForText() with all above parameters. For the text string, use a regular expression to find it.
	// 6. The test has two cases, when the text exists on the screen and when not.
	// 7. Use the Assert statement to verify that "Program/procedure" exsits on the emulator screen.

	//Identify Window and Screen based on descriptive properties.
	var screen = Desktop.$(TE.Window({
			shortName: "A"
		}
	)).$(TE.Screen({
			label: "screen10365"
		}
	));
	//Identify Field based on descriptive properties.
	var field = screen.$(TE.Field({
			attachedText: "User",
			isProtected: false
		}
	));

	//Insert dummy text to an unprotected field.
	field.setText("Something");


	//Call WaitForText method with inserted text to find it on the emulator screen.
	//The method will return a bool to indicate if the text was found or not. For this case, we should have true.
	//If we don't create an Area object, the method will search in whole screen.
	screen.waitForText(new RegExp("Something"), 500).then(function (isText) {
		assert.deepEqual(isText, true);
	});

	//Call WaitForText method with below parameters to find the text on the emulator screen.
	//The method will return a bool to indicate if the text was found or not. For this case, we should have true.
	screen.waitForText(new RegExp("Program/procedure"), {top: 8, left: 17, bottom: 8, right: 33}, 500).then(function (res) {
		assert.deepEqual(res, true);
	});

	//Call WaitForText method with below parameters to find the text on the emulator screen.
	//The method will return a bool to indicate if the text was found or not. For this case, we should have false.
	screen.waitForText("12352", {top: 8, left: 17, bottom: 8, right: 33}, 500).then(function (res) {
		assert.deepEqual(res, false);
	});

	LFT.whenDone(done);
});

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Send a TE Key on the screen

This example demonstrates how to use terminal emulator objects and their respective properties to send a TE Key on the screen

it("Verify sendTEKeys method",function(done){
	// Following is the program flow:
	// 1. Need to have a Terminal Emulator configured.
	// 2. Identify a TeScreen test object based on some descriptive properties.
	// 3. Call method SendKey() with a string as parameter, for example "Something", and a TE Key, for example Backspace.
	// 4. Call WaitForText() method to verify if the inserted text exists.

	//Identify Window and Screen based on descriptive properties.
	var screen = Desktop.$(TE.Window({
			shortName:"A"
		}
	)).$(TE.Screen({
			label:"screen10365"
		}
	));

	//Call SendTEKeys method with a string and a TE Key
	//The method will send to the emulator screen (at the cursor position) the string text + the TE Key.
	screen.sendTEKeys("Something" + TE.Keys.backspace);

	//Call WaitForText method with inserted text to find it on the emulator screen.
	//The method will return a bool to indicate if the text was found or not. For this case, we should have true.
	//If we don't create an Area object, the method will search in whole screen.
	screen.waitForText(new RegExp("Somethin")).then(function (res) {
		assert.deepEqual(res, true);
	});

	LFT.whenDone(done);
});

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